Why do you lead? | Highlights from Day 1 of #LinkageGILD

By Jennifer McCollum on September 16, 2019

Linkage’s Global Institute for Leadership Development® has officially kicked off in beautiful Palm Desert, California! Over 300 leaders have joined us from around the globe for four days of self-discovery and inspiration–and to dive into what it means to live and lead purposefully. We’re asking big questions in preparation for what promises to an action-packed week: Why do I lead? How do I lead? What kind of leader do I want to become?

We are thrilled to bring you daily highlights, including our favorite sound bites—and some of the most memorable leadership ideas, concepts, and quotes shared by our expert faculty. Whether you are here with us or not, we hope that these insights will help you think about why you lead—you might even learn something new about yourself in the process—or find something useful to share with your team.

No matter where you are in the world, you can catch all of the action taking place on center stage by following us on Twitter or Instagram, and by using #LinkageGILD. Without further ado, here is a summary of today’s keynote faculty:

Richard Leider on Purpose

Linkage GILD co-chair Richard Leider took center stage and challenged us to think about our purpose; our aim in life. Purpose is a mindset. Purpose is not a goal. It’s a direction. It isn’t a luxury—it’s fundamental. It’s up to each one of us to uncover our calling. Are you living in a place you love, with the right people, doing the right work, and fulfilling your purpose?

What we learned: 

  • A quick and practical approach to exploring why we are here. Gifts + Passions + Values = Calling
  • If you have a pulse, you have a purpose. Purpose is something we do. It’s not just something we have.
  • Your default purpose is to grow and to give. That is the key to becoming a leader.
  • Try this daily leadership practice to clarify your purpose:
  • 1) From 1-10 (low to high), do you love your work? 2) Are you really into what you do? 3) Do you love the people you serve?

Looking for more wisdom from Richard? Read his take on the seven questions you should ask yourself right now.

Margaret Heffernan on Engage

Entrepreneur and author Margaret Heffernan urged us to rethink how we define productivity and success in our organization. Even though we tend to value the employees who outperform others, this isn’t what brings the highest levels of achievement. When we think differently about people, we uncover new ways to achieve breakthrough success with and through others.

The more that we try to define what people must do each day, the less responsible they feel for anything or anyone else. A company isn’t a machine. It is a social system. It is human relationships. When cultures are healthy, spontaneous and generous, it allows people to do amazing work that no one else can do.

What we learned:

  • Don’t underestimate social capital–it allows insight, information, passion, and engagement to amplify and spread throughout an organization.
  • Companies don’t have ideas, people do. We can do more together than we can do individually.
  • A culture of helpfulness depends on generosity, reciprocity, and trust. Practice asking for help and giving help. Listen to others.
  • Be human. Go and talk to people. Ask people what it’s like to work at your company.
  • Companies are made up of people who care—they aren’t machines.

To hear more from Margaret, follow her on Twitter: @M_Heffernan.

Roger Nierenberg on Inspire

Leading by listening. Paul Simon has said, “Of all the 5 senses, sound is the most powerful.” Orchestras achieve synchronicity through various mechanisms, all of which are similar to how teams interact and deliver results and are a perfect example of systems thinking. An organization is only as successful as the sum of its parts.

What we learned: 

  • KPIs are a good way to understand if your leadership style needs modulating.
  • Understanding and recognizing what captures your team’s attention and imagination allows you to be a more influential leader.
  • Remember what your role is as a leader. Being more directive doesn’t necessarily guarantee better results.

Download a chapter from “Maestro”. And to keep up with the news from The Music Paradigm, follow Roger on Twitter: @RogerNierenberg.

Posted in Leadership Development Tagged with: , , ,

About Jennifer McCollum

Jennifer McCollum is CEO of Linkage, where she oversees the strategic direction and global operations of the Burlington, MA-based company. She has 20 years of experience building and leading businesses in the leadership space, with a focus on leadership development, assessment and analytics. Her area of expertise includes bringing analytic rigor to critical talent decisions by linking leadership behavior to corporate performance outcomes.

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Linkage’s Global Institute for Leadership Development®

Woman at GILD

4 Days. 8 Keynote Speakers. Boundless Opportunities.

Sept. 16-19, 2019 | Palm Desert, CA

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